Our Comics, Ourselves: Identity, Expression, and Representation in Comic Art

Fenwick Gallery at George Mason University is pleased to host “Our Comics, Ourselves,” an exhibition highlighting themes of identity, expression, and representation in comic books and graphic novels. The exhibition will run from August 21, 2017 through October 6, 2017, with an opening reception and curator’s talk on Friday, September 15th.

Learn more about Our Comics, Ourselves and see a calendar of related events.

Process Logs: Exhibition Lecture with Helen Frederick

Navigation Press at Mason: Exhibition Lecture with Helen Frederick

Thursday, July 13
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Fenwick Library Reading Room, 2nd Floor (Room 2001)

The artistic process is often perceived as a solitary act, with an artist independently researching, developing, and executing their ideas. In the history of printmaking, however, the atelier, or workshop model is a longstanding tradition, with artists and apprentices working closely together to complete a finished masterwork.

Join Helen Frederick (Professor Emeritus, Mason School of Art) for a lecture on the foundations of Navigation Press, a printmaking residency program at Mason, and the artistic and learning opportunities afforded by the workshop model. The lecture will conclude with a walk-through of “Process Logs: Prints, Plates, and Sketches from Navigation Press at Mason,” currently on display in the Fenwick Gallery.

Process Logs: Prints, Plates, and Sketches from Navigation Press at Mason


Process Logs:
Prints, Plates, and Sketches from
Navigation Press at Mason

May 8 – August 11, 2017

Navigation Press is a master printmaking residency within the School of Art (SOA) at George Mason University, established in 2006 by Helen Frederick and Harold Linton. Each year, a visiting artist spends a week in the print studio with students and a master printmaker to complete a limited-edition print, while also participating in lectures, workshops, and critiques. While many are master printmakers themselves, the visiting artists of Navigation Press have represented a variety of artistic backgrounds and media, including painting, sculpture, book art, and zines.

“Process Logs” highlights five Navigation Press artists and their completed prints, as well as the often-invisible practices behind the finished work. The exhibition also introduces the many behind-the-scenes printmaking collaborators who made these works possible.

The artistic process is often perceived as a solitary act, with an artist independently researching, developing, and executing their ideas. However, the studio or atelier model is a longstanding tradition in the history of printmaking. Students learn from working alongside contemporary masters, gaining hands-on experience in the production of large editions. Meanwhile, the master printmaker supports the artists in translating their artwork and ideas into prints, which may include screen printing, lithography, digital printing, and etching.

Visitors will have an opportunity to see the artifacts of various stages of the printmaking process, including original printing plates, multi-layered transparencies, and preparatory sketches.

“Process Logs: Prints, Plates, and Sketches from Navigation Press at Mason” will be on exhibition in the Fenwick Gallery of George Mason University from May 8 through August 11, 2017. The gallery is located on the first floor of Fenwick Library on Mason’s Fairfax campus. Visitors may find nearby parking in the Rappahannock Deck.

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Gilbert & Sullivan

Gilbert & Sullivan

March 1 – May 1, 2017

Exhibition Locations:
Special Collections Research Center Gallery / 2400 Fenwick Library / Second Floor
Pop-up Gallery / 2700 Fenwick Library/ Second Floor

Fenwick Gallery / Fenwick Atrium / First Floor



British dramatist W. S. Gilbert and composer Arthur Sullivan were perhaps the most popular and influential collaboration in the history of musical theatre. Their famous comic operas — including H.M.S. Pinafore, The Pirates of Penzance, and The Mikado — continue to fill theatres and delight audiences to this day.

Gilbert                          
W.S. Gilbert                                                      Arthur Sullivan

“Oh, Joy Unbounded…”: A Celebration of Gilbert & Sullivan, featuring items from the David and Annabelle Stone Gilbert & Sullivan Collection, is a tribute to this lasting delight. The exhibition showcases memorabilia from all fourteen Gilbert & Sullivan operas, the individual compositions of each man, and personal items from their lives. In addition, the exhibition contains representative examples of other works performed by the D’Oyly Carte Opera Company, the chief custodians of the Gilbert & Sullivan tradition for over 100 years, until its closure in 1982.


The exhibition is part of a larger celebration of the famous duo, which the University Libraries and the College of Visual and Performing Arts are coordinating at Mason throughout 2017. This celebration includes performances of A Gilbert & Sullivan Review, H.M.S. Pinafore, and Iolanthe; an additional exhibition of Gilbert & Sullivan Memorabilia at the Hylton Performing Arts Center; and a scholarly forum, “A Celebration of Gilbert & Sullivan,” on April 29.

Flying Words: Nahid & Nasrin Navab


In solidarity with ALMutanabbi Street Start Here (ASSH) Project 2017

Flying Words Catalog

Poetry Reading and Artists’ Talk 

February 7, 2017
Noon to  2 p.m.     Room 3001    Third Floor    Fenwick Library
Fairfax Campus



Sisters Nahid and Nasrin Navab are two DC-based Iranian-American artists. They express their love for literature, art, freedom of expression and social justice through the creation of Flying Words, a collection of drawings, handprints, installations, and artistic books exhibited in Fenwick Gallery from January 18 to February 24, 2017.

Growing up in Iran during the 1960s and 1970s, the work of Nahid and Nasrin reflect their experience with international artists, authors, and poets. Flying Words is a tribute to literature that brings people together despite geographic borders, cultural barriers, age, gender, and racial differences. A number of these books have rested in their hearts, stimulated their imaginations and touched their personal lives in intimate social ways.

Nahid and Nasrin dedicate this exhibition to the Al Mutanabbi Street Starts Here 2017 project. Their past collaboration with the AMSSH-DC 2016 project fed their passion for art as a means of connection and an agent of change.